Quitting Tobacco

 

One of the most preventable causes of death in the United States is tobacco use. The health of our military families is essential to our country's success. Smoking or chewing tobacco compromises your health and the health of those around you. Make it your mission to take steps toward quitting today.

The rewards are waiting for you!

Quitting isn't easy for anyone. But imagine the health rewards. During physical exertion, your brain releases endorphins that make you feel more naturally alert, similar to the effect of drinking a cup of coffee. You'll find that your endurance will increase and you'll perform better on fitness tests. You'll even lower your risk of injury and hospitalization.

 

Access these stop-smoking resources

You or anyone in your family can visit:

  • The Tobacco Center on the Live and Work Well site for helpful information and tools
  • Ucanquit.org, another valuable resource to help you achieve your goal. Innovative tools and live support are there for you 24/7.
  • The TRICARE/United Healthcare Military & Veterans Smoking Cessation Line toll-free 1-888-713-4597.

 

Be aware of the dangers with continued use

Tobacco use (including cigars) causes:

  • Cancer (Lung, Esophagus, Mouth etc.)
  • Coronary Heart Disease and COPD
  • Stroke
  • Lung diseases (including emphysema, bronchitis, and chronic airway obstruction)
  • Premature birth, low birth weight, stillbirth, and infant death
  • Potential organ damage

 

Smokeless tobacco is just as dangerous. It causes oral health issues such as:

  • Cancer of the mouth and gums
  • Periodontitis
  • Tooth loss

 

Second-hand smoke causes:

  • Ear Infections
  • Asthma attacks
  • Respirator symptoms
  • Childhood infections

 

References:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Annual smoking-attributable mortality, years of potential life lost, and economic costs - United States, 1995 -1999. MMWR. 2002;51(14):300-3 [cited 2009 Aug 18].

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. The health benefits of smoking cessation: A report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: CDC; 1990.

Jensen, R. G. (1986). The effect of cigarette smoking on Army Physical Readiness Test performance of enlisted Army medical department personnel. Military Medicine, 151, 83 - 85.

Robbins, A. S., Fonseca, V. P., Chao, S. Y., Coil, G. A., Bell, N. S., & Amoroso, P. J. (2000). Short-term effects of cigarette smoking on hospitalization and associated lost workdays in a young, healthy population. Tobacco Control, 9, 389 - 396. Retrieved 26 November 2012, from Short term effects of cigarette smoking on hospitalization and associated lost workdays in a young healthy population.

Sources:

Department of Defense, Quit Tobacco - Make Everyone Proud.http://www.ucanquit2.org/default.aspx. Accessed Jan. 23, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Second Hand Smoke (SHS) Fact Sheet. Accessed Jan. 19, 2013.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Health Effects of Cigarette Smoking. Accessed Jan. 19, 2013.

Healthypeople.gov. Tobacco Use. Accessed Jan. 23, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Health Effects of Cigarette Smoking. Accessed Jan. 19, 2013.

Healthypeople.gov. Tobacco Use. Accessed. Jan. 23, 2013.